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Trump arrives in Japan for ceremonial visit as trade tensions loom

first_img Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off More Explained Trump ‘walked the talk’ in pressuring Pak to end terrorism: Indian envoy to US ‘They gave you Nobel for what?’ clueless Trump asks Yazidi activist Nadia Murad Trump secures billion dollar deal to eradicate AIDS from US in a decade Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Related News By Reuters |Tokyo | Published: May 25, 2019 2:39:32 pm Advertising Advertising Best Of Express Trump arrives in Japan for ceremonial visit as trade tensions loom Tokyo: US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at the Haneda International Airport Saturday, May 25, 2019, in Tokyo.(AP/PTI)US President Donald Trump and his wife, Melania, landed in Japan on Saturday on a largely ceremonial visit meant to showcase strong ties with Tokyo even as trade tensions loom. “So it’s a great thing. And we get along very well with Japan. I get along very well with the Prime Minister.”After his arrival, Trump was due to meet with business leaders before retiring.On Sunday, Trump and Abe are expected to play golf and attend a sumo match. On Monday, they will discuss North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs in addition to trade.A medium-strength earthquake hit eastern Japan, causing buildings to shake in Tokyo, hours before Trump’s arrival. P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Taking stock of monsoon rain Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will treat Trump to an imperial banquet and front row seats at a sumo tournament during the trip, which lasts through Tuesday.The two men share a warm relationship, which the Japanese leader aims to emphasize as Washington mulls tariffs on Japanese auto exports that the Trump administration views as a potential national security threat.The United States is in the middle of an expensive trade war with China in protest against Beijing’s treatment of US companies, and tensions with Japan and the European Union over trade are simmering. Trump and Abe are expected to discuss trade during talks on Monday, but officials have played down the possibility of a deal during the visit.Trump will become the first foreign leader to be received by new Japanese Emperor Naruhito since he inherited the throne earlier this month.He made clear during an impromptu news conference on Thursday that he was flattered by the invitation.“Prime Minister Abe said to me, very specifically, ‘You are the guest of honor.’ There’s only one guest of honor … I’m the guest of honor at the biggest event that they’ve had in over 200 years,” Trump said. The epicentre was southern Chiba, southeast of the capital, the prefecture where Trump is due to play golf on Sunday.No tsunami warning was issued and there were no immediate reports of damage. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Bengal 7 injured as TMC and BJP workers clash over cut money

first_img Kolkata: FIR lodged against Metro Railway after death of senior citizen Related News  Trinamool congress, TMC bengal, West bengal, cut money blowback, tmc workers, BJP TMC clash, kolkata police, bengal tmc workers, west bengal, indian express Police have detained 20 people after the incident. (Express photo Sweety Kumari/File)Clashes erupted between TMC and BJP workers at a village in West Bengal’s East Medinipur district on Monday over ‘cut money’, leaving seven people injured and two police vehicles damaged. Police have detained 20 people after the incident.The incident took place during a march taken out by BJP workers against ‘cut money’ at Patashpur village. According to police sources, the BJP workers clashed with police as well as Trinamool supporters after they were stopped from carrying out the march. Post Comment(s) Row over Jai Shri Ram slogan: Hooghly town tense after BJP claims its worker injured in police firing By Express News Service |Kolkata | Published: July 9, 2019 2:48:27 am West Bengal: Man shot at in Jhargram, BJP alleges TMC hand last_img read more

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European Union signs free trade agreement with Vietnam

first_imgMeanwhile, Vietnam will lift 49% of its import duties on EU exports when the agreement is started. The rest will be phased out over 10 years.Vietnam, with a population of 95 million, is one of the world’s fastest-growing economies, and the agreement is expected to accelerate greater trade volume and create vast opportunities for businesses and consumers on both sides.“The agreement is very important for Vietnam,” said economist Pham Chi Lan, a former adviser to several Vietnamese prime ministers. “On one hand, it will urge the country to fasten its constitutional reform to match clauses in the agreement. On the other, it will boost the economy, especially in the private sector.”Major exports from Vietnam to the EU include phones, footwear, farm products, textiles and garments. Vietnam imports from EU nations high-tech machinery and equipment, aircraft, vehicles and pharmaceutical products. Once the deal takes effect, the EU will lift 85% of its tariffs on Vietnamese goods, gradually cutting the rest over the following seven years. REUTERS/KhamVietnam and the European Union signed a free trade agreement on Sunday, opening opportunities to further boost trade between the euro bloc and one of Southeast Asia’s biggest manufacturing nations. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Europe should brace for US tariffs on several fronts, says German official Best Of Express The agreement, which was signed by European Commissioner for Trade Cecilia Malmstrom and Vietnamese Trade Minister Tran Tuan Anh in Hanoi, Vietnam’s capital, will eliminate almost all tariffs for goods traded between Vietnam and the EU’s 28 member countries.“It is a special day for relations between the EU and Vietnam. The agreement has opened a new horizon for the development of both sides,” Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc said after he witnessed the signing.Once the deal takes effect, the EU will lift 85% of its tariffs on Vietnamese goods, gradually cutting the rest over the following seven years. EU slaps sanctions on Turkey over gas drilling off Cyprus After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertisingcenter_img Advertising Vietnam is the EU’s second-largest trading partner in Southeast Asia, with trade turnover of $56 billion last year, according to the national general statistics office.The agreement, which had been negotiated since 2012, gives EU companies equal treatment with domestic bidders in competing for public contracts in Vietnam. It also commits Vietnam to standards for sustainable development, including improving its human rights record, protecting labor rights and upholding its pledges to deal with climate change issues under the Paris accord.Vietnam and the EU also signed an agreement calling for investors to be protected with rules enforced by an investment court system. “In the context of the ongoing trade war and protectionism, the agreement is a positive signal that global trade cooperation is still a trend and on its right track,” Lan said.The deal is the EU’s second free trade agreement in the Southeast Asian region, after one with Singapore. It is viewed as a stepping stone for pursuing a comprehensive deal with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, a 10-nation bloc with a combined population of 650 million. EU probes Amazon over use of retailer info to gain edge By AP |Hanoi | Published: June 30, 2019 7:19:15 pm Related News Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence 2 Comment(s)last_img read more

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Greek Conservatives take charge in landslide win vow more investment fewer taxes

first_imgBy Reuters |Athens | Updated: July 8, 2019 9:24:14 am NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Advertising Greek opposition New Democracy conservative party leader Kyriakos Mitsotakis, left, talks to his supporters after win the parliamentary elections at the New Democracy headquarters in Athens, on Sunday, July 7, 2019. (AP)Mitsotakis said in a televised address that the election outcome gave him a strong and clear mandate to change Greece.“I am committed to fewer taxes, many investments, for good and new jobs, and growth which will bring better salaries and higher pensions in an efficient state,” Mitsotakis said.Tsipras said he respected the will of the Greek people.“Today, with our head held high we accept the people’s verdict. To bring Greece to where it is today we had to take difficult decisions (with) a heavy political cost,” he told journalists. Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief People celebrate outside New Democracy conservative party’s headquarters, after the general election in Athens, Greece, July 7, 2019. (Reuters)Tsipras took over from the conservatives in 2015 as Greece was at the peak of a financial crisis which had ravaged the country since 2010. Initially vowing to resist deeper austerity, he was forced into signing up to another bailout months after his election, a decision which went down badly with voters.The handover will take place on Monday, after Mitsotakis’s swearing-in as new Prime Minister.Sunday’s poll was the first national election since the country shook off close scrutiny by its European partners who loaned Greece billions in three bailouts.Tsipras signed up to the latest, in 2015, in return for debt relief. Greece, Greece election, Greece election result, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Kyriakos Mitsotakis Greece, Greece Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Greece Prime Minister, Greece election news, World news, Indian Express, latest news New Democracy conservative party leader Kyriakos Mitsotakis speaks outside party’s headquarters, after the general election in Athens, Greece, July 7, 2019. (Reuters)Greece’s opposition conservatives returned to power with a landslide victory in snap elections on Sunday, and Prime Minister-elect Kyriakos Mitsotakis said he had a clear mandate for change, pledging more investments and fewer taxes. In one neighbourhood, activists stormed a polling station and made off with a ballot box. More Explained In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Best Of Express NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Advertising Mitsotakis, 51, assumed the helm of New Democracy in 2016. Although he is regarded as a liberal, his party also harbours members with more right-wing views.Golden Dawn, an extreme right-wing party detractors accuse of having neo-Nazi sympathies, lost significant ground with early results suggesting it may not reach the 3 per cent threshold to parliament.SNAP ELECTION“The basic reason (for the result) is the economy,” said analyst Theodore Couloumbis. “In the past 4.5 years people saw no improvement, on the contrary there were cutbacks in salaries and pensions,” he said.The focus now turns to Mitsotakis’s picks for the key economics ministries – finance, energy, development and foreign affairs. He has been tight-lipped on choices during the campaign.Mitsotakis will inherit an economy that is growing at a moderate clip – at a 1.3% annual pace in the first quarter – and public finances that may fall short of targets agreed with official lenders.The Bank of Greece projects that 3.5% of GDP primary surplus target that excludes debt servicing outlays is likely to be missed this year and reach just 2.9% of economic output.With Greece still challenged by its debt overhang, the fiscal policy stance of the new government will be closely watched.The real test will be next year’s budget with Mitsotakiss expected to outline the key contours in the traditional economic address in Thessaloniki in September.“I want the government that will be elected to do its best for the people, who are hungry,” said pensioner Christos Mpekos, 69. “To give jobs to the young so they don’t leave.”Tsipras says that a vote cast for Mitsotakis would go to the political establishment, which forced Greece to the edge of the precipice in the first place.But he has also been roundly criticised for mismanagement of crises and for brokering a deeply unpopular deal to end a dispute over the name of neighbouring North Macedonia.Greece wrapped up its last economic adjustment programme in 2018 but remains under surveillance from lenders to ensure no future fiscal slippage. While economic growth has returned, Greek unemployment of 18 per cent is the euro zone’s highest.New Democracy has promised to invest in creating well-paid jobs with decent benefits. It has also promised to be tough on crime in some neighbourhoods of Athens where there is a strong anti-establishment movement. Top News Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Advertising The win appeared driven by fatigue with years of European Union-enforced belt-tightening, combined with high unemployment, after the country almost crashed out of the euro zone at the height of its financial travails in 2015.Conservative New Democracy had a commanding lead of 39.6 percent of the vote based on 73 percent of the votes counted versus 31.6 percent for incumbent leftist Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ Syriza, the official interior ministry tally showed.Exit polls showed New Democracy winning between 155 and 167 seats in the 300 member parliament, taking advantage of an electoral system which gives bonus seats to the frontrunner. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Army Chief Bipin Rawat warns Pakistan Misadventure will be repelled with punitive

first_imgBy Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 13, 2019 5:31:56 pm Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Related News Army chief Bipin Rawat: Troops fully prepared to meet emerging security challenges Advertising Advertising Addressing a seminar in New Delhi to mark the 20th year of the Kargil conflict, Rawat said, “Pakistan Army time and again resorts to misadventure, either through flawed proxy wars and state-sponsored terror or intrusions. The Indian Army stands resolute to defend our territory. Let there be no doubt that any misadventure will be repelled with a punitive response.”“Future conflicts will be more violent and unpredictable where the importance of human factor shall remain undiminished. Our soldiers are and will remain our primary assets,” he added.The rise of non-state actors and the readiness to use terror and other irregular methods of fighting have become a new norm, he said. “There is no intrusion,” Rawat said on the sidelines of an event.The Army Chief’s statement comes amidst reports of Chinese soldiers crossing the Line of Actual Control (LAC) last week after some Tibetans hoisted Tibetan flags on the occasion of Dalai Lama’s birthday on July 6.“Chinese come and patrol to their perceived Line of Actual Control…we try and prevent them. But at times there are celebrations that take place at the local levels. Celebrations were going on our side by our Tibetans in the Demchok sector. Based on that, some Chinese also came to see what was happening. But there has been no intrusions. Everything is normal,” the Army chief said.India and China share a disputed border and the armies of the two countries were engaged in a stand-off for 73 days in 2017 in Doklam.center_img Best Of Express The Army Chief also noted that the addition of cyber and space domain has changed the battlefield scenario.He asserted that no act of terror will go unpunished. “Surgical strikes post-Uri and Balakot (terror attacks) have amply demonstrated our political and military resolve against terror. Any act of terror will not go unpunished,” he said.Eight hundred terrorists were killed since 2014, of which 249 were in 2018, the Centre had informed Parliament earlier this month. In a written response to a question in the Lok Sabha, Minister of State in the Defence Ministry Shripad Naik said 104 terrorists were killed in 2014, 97 in 2015, 140 in 2016 and 210 in 2017.On the eastern front, Rawat said there had been no intrusion by the Chinese in Ladakh’s Demchok sector. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence President Kovind presents Gallantry Awards, Army Chief Bipin Rawat among recipients kargil war, kargil war anniversary, bipin rawat, india pakistan tension, india pakistan relations Chief of Army Staff General Bipin Rawat. (PTI/File)Sending out a stern message to Pakistan, Chief of Army Staff General Bipin Rawat on Saturday said there should be no doubt that “any misadventure will be repelled with a punitive response”. The Army chief warned that any future conflicts would prove to be more “violent and unpredictable” and the Army would not take into account the human factor. Major Leetul Gogoi to be posted out of Kashmir Valley 26 Comment(s)last_img read more

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New EUfunded project provides insight into how the brain develops

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 6 2018The human brain is comprised of billions of different types of cells. These cells are then organized into sophisticated networks, each of which determines a specific function of the brain. But how do the neurons, or nerve cells that form these networks, find the right network? And what happens when they don’t?To find out, the EU-funded MOMECODE project tracked the generation and migration of neurons in the developing cerebral cortex – the largest part of the brain responsible for much of our thoughts and actions. Using a powerful genetic methodology called MADM (Mosaic Analysis with Double Markers) that provides an unprecedented resolution of a single cell, MOMECODE researchers were able to precisely determine how neural stem cells progressively build up the cerebral.“For the first time, we quantitatively mapped the output of neural stem cells during the brain’s development,” says MOMECODE researcher Simon Hippenmeyer. “What we discovered was that the proliferation behaviour of neural stem cells is precisely regulated.”Stem cells and a healthy brainAccording to Hippenmeyer, stem cells are characterised by their capacity to differentiate into multiple cell types. During embryonic development, neural stem cells produce the neurons and glia (a connecting tissue) that form the foundation of our nervous system. By tracking the behaviour of these neural stem cells, MOMECODE researchers were able to predict their neuron and glia cell output. “This adds to our understanding of the important role that stem cells play in generating a brain of the correct size,” says Hippenmeyer.Such insight is key to understanding diseases associated with brain malformation, such as microcephaly (a small brain) and macrocephaly (an oversized brain). “Diseases associated with defects in neural stem cells or the brain’s development put a huge burden on society,” adds Hippenmeyer. “Although still far in the future, we are convinced that the findings emerging from our basic scientific approach will contribute, in one way or the other way, to how we eventually diagnose, prevent and perhaps even treat these diseases.”Related StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryAnother important finding addresses the ‘nature versus nurture’ question of our brain’s development. In other words, how do genes and other hereditary factors control brain development in a tight interplay with environmental variables? By using sophisticated genetic approaches, MOMECODE researchers looked at both how intrinsic cellular programmes (nature) and the surrounding stem cell niche (nurture) impact neuron output and glia production during the brain’s development. “Unexpectedly, we found a very high degree of environmental factors impacting overall development, which may be relevant to our understanding of brain malformation and neurodevelopmental diseases,” says Hippenmeyer.More research aheadWith the original research being done on mice, Hippenmeyer and his team are now working to translate their findings to human cells – laying the groundwork for an investigation into the underlying basis of neurodevelopmental disorders.“During the project, I was in the unique position to contribute to the education of the next generation of molecular life scientists, which I consider to be a privilege and which I greatly appreciate,” says Hippenmeyer.Rigorously building on the MOMECODE framework, Hippenmeyer and has his team have inaugurated a series of innovative functional genetic studies aimed at determining the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of the brain’s development. “We anticipate that these lines of research will contribute to our general understanding of the fundamental genetic mechanisms that control the brain’s development in both health and disease,” he adds. Source:http://ec.europa.eu/research/infocentre/article_en.cfm?id=/research/headlines/news/article_18_12_06-1_en.html?infocentre&item=Infocentre&artid=49818last_img read more

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Women and men with heart attack symptoms receive different care from EMS

first_img Source:https://publichealth.gwu.edu/content/women-and-men-heart-attack-symptoms-get-different-treatment-emergency-medical-services-study Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 11 2018Women are more likely than men to die of coronary heart disease, and past research has found that they are less likely to receive evidence-based therapies for heart attacks. Now, researchers from the George Washington University (GW) have examined the care that women and men with heart attack symptoms receive from emergency medical services (EMS) after a 911 call and found that women were less likely to receive aspirin, be resuscitated, or be transported to the hospital in ambulances using lights and sirens. They report their findings in a new study published in Women’s Health Issues.Women’s Health Issues is the official journal of the Jacobs Institute of Women’s Health, which is based in the Department of Health Policy and Management at GW Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH).Melissa L. McCarthy, ScD, MS, a professor of health policy at Milken Institute SPH and professor of emergency medicine at GW School of Medicine & Health Sciences (SMHS), and colleagues used 2010-2013 data from the National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) database, which collects EMS patient care reports from 46 states. They analyzed EMS responses for patients age 40 and up with chest pain or cardiac arrest (more than 2 million during the study period) and examined medications and treatments recommended by American Heart Association guidelines for possible cardiovascular events or cardiac arrest: aspirin, electrocardiogram, and cardiac monitoring for chest pain, and resuscitation and defibrillation for cardiac arrest. They also examined use of lights and siren to transport patients, and time intervals between EMS dispatch and arrival at the hospital.Related StoriesStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesHeart disease is still the number 1 killer in Australia, according to latest figuresStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsOverall, the paper’s authors found low rates of recommended treatment for chest pain and higher rates for cardiac arrest. Women with chest pain were less likely than men to receive aspirin or be transported with lights and siren, and women with cardiac arrest were less likely to be resuscitated. Differences were small but statistically significant – and, the authors note, small differences still translate to thousands of patients.The NEMSIS database does not contain information on treatment contraindications or other such factors that could explain these gender differences. “The low rate of aspirin administration we observed may be due to patient use before EMS arrival, daily aspirin use, or an allergy to aspirin,” the authors note. Nonetheless, McCarthy and colleagues write, “We also cannot rule out the possibility that there is an underappreciation of women’s heart disease risk by EMS providers.” They recommend additional research with the aim of ensuring both men and women receive optimal treatment.”This study makes an important contribution to gender equity by identifying a type of care where more attention is needed,” said Women’s Health Issues Editor-in-Chief Amita Vyas, PhD, MHS, an associate professor of prevention and community health at Milken Institute SPH. “We know that women are less likely to receive some forms of evidence-based cardiac care from doctors and hospitals, and this study alerts us to the need to more closely examine care provided by EMS agencies, too.”last_img read more

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AI could predict Alzheimers disease six years prior to diagnosis

first_imgOne of the difficulties with Alzheimer’s disease is that by the time all the clinical symptoms manifest and we can make a definitive diagnosis, too many neurons have died, making it essentially irreversible.”Dr. Jae Ho Sohn, Study Author Sources:Artificial Intelligence Can Detect Alzheimer’s Disease in Brain Scans Six Years Before a Diagnosis.A Deep Learning Model to Predict a Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease by Using 18F-FDG PET of the Brain. Radiology. 6 Nov 2018. By Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Jan 3 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, have used PET scans to train a machine-learning algorithm to detect early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.James Steidl | ShutterstockThe algorithm was able to detect the condition about six years before it was clinically diagnosed.Given that drugs are available that can help stem Alzheimer’s progression if it is caught early on, the development has the potential to help doctors intervene before the condition becomes irreversible.center_img As recently reported in the journal Radiology, Dr. Jae Ho Sohn and colleagues used the new approach to try to predict whether a patient would develop Alzheimer’s after they first exhibited signs of impaired memory – the optimal time to intervene.Brain cells rely on glucose for fuel and the more active brain cells are, the more glucose they use. Once brain cells become diseased, they gradually use less glucose until they die and use none at all.Glucose PET scans therefore represent a cheap way of diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms have advanced.Radiologists have tried using glucose PET scans to detect Alzheimer’s by looking for reduced glucose levels in the brain, but because the disease is so slow to progress, the changes can be difficult to spot with the naked eye.Now, Sohn has trained a machine-learning algorithm using PET scans from a dataset called the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, a massive catalogue of scans from patients who were eventually confirmed to have Alzheimer’s, mild cognitive impairment or no disorder.Eventually, the algorithm started to learn which features are key in predicting a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s and once it had been fed 1,921 scans, the team tested it on two new datasets.One dataset included 188 further images from the ADNI database that had not yet been presented to the algorithm and the other included a completely new set of scans from 40 patients who had presented with potential cognitive impairment.The algorithm correctly identified 92% of patients who went on to develop Alzheimer’s in the first dataset and 98% in the second dataset. Furthermore, it achieved these predictions an average of just over six years before patient’s received a final diagnosis.Sohn says the algorithm now needs to be validated and calibrated in a larger and more diverse cohort, because it has the potential to become clinically relevant.He thinks that if the algorithm survives these tests, it could be used as a predictive and diagnostic tool when a patient visits a memory clinic, helping to ensure they get the treatments they need earlier on.last_img read more

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Removing 70 or more of the brain hemorrhage could produce better outcomes

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 8 2019In the first study to identify specific surgical goals for the treatment of an intracerebral hemorrhage–the deadliest and most disabling type of stroke–a team of neurosurgeons found that at least 70 percent of the hemorrhage has to be removed for patients to make a meaningful recovery.Worldwide, more than 1 million people each year develop an intracerebral hemorrhage. It occurs when a diseased blood vessel within the brain bursts, allowing blood to leak inside the brain. Hemorrhagic strokes make up about 12 percent of all strokes, but they cause about 40 percent of all stroke deaths. The most common risk factor is high blood pressure.In this study, the researchers found that removing 70 percent or more of the hemorrhage could produce better outcomes. Ideally, there should be no more than 15 milliliters, about a tablespoon of clotted blood, remaining at the site of the injury. Anything less than that was even better.This is the first surgical trial to connect specific volume-reduction goals with improved functional outcomes. Prior to this trial, known as MISTIE III (Minimally Invasive Surgery Plus rt-PA for Intracerebral Hemorrhage Evacuation), there was no specified goal for clot removal.”We found that for surgeons treating a brain hemorrhage, it is critical to maximize the amount of blood the surgeon can safely remove from the site,” said study leader Issam Awad, MD, the John Harper Seeley Professor in Neurological Sciences and Director of Neurovascular Surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine. “Unless at least 70 percent of the clot is promptly removed and only a very small residual amount of blood remains, the potential benefits of surgery will not be realized.””This cannot be taken for granted,” he added. “Intracerebral hemorrhage is a catastrophic illness. When surgery is performed, we must be certain that the blood is in fact removed. Surprisingly, this had not been considered in assessing the effectiveness of surgery. This is the first surgical trial to demonstrate a clear and urgent goal for reduction of intracerebral hemorrhage volume.”Two research teams will present data from MISTIE III in back-to-back “late-breaking-science” presentations at the American Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference in Honolulu, on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. Awad will report on the ability of aggressive clot removal to produce better functional outcomes. Daniel Hanley, MD, from Johns Hopkins Medicine, will present data on overall analyses of safety and efficacy of the surgery.Related StoriesStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsThe trial involved 78 hospitals in North America, Europe and Asia. Between December 30, 2013 and August 15, 2017, researchers enrolled 506 patients at least 18 years old who had suffered a spontaneous, non-traumatic, intracerebral hemorrhage in the previous 24 hours. Patients were promptly treated and periodically evaluated at regular intervals for one year.About half (255) of the patients enrolled in the trial were randomly assigned to the MISTIE surgical procedure. The other 251 patients were assigned to the study’s medical arm, which includes ICU care but no surgical intervention. Thirteen patients left the surgical arm for various reasons, so 242 patients received the procedure and were available for evaluation.The surgical approach to an intracerebral hemorrhage relies on careful mapping of the injury with computed tomography (CT) guidance. The surgical team then drills a small hole in the patient’s skull and inserts a tiny rigid cannula. The surgeons maneuver the cannula to the blood that has accumulated in the brain and aspirate as much of it as possible.Since the blood has already clotted, it cannot all be suctioned, so a softer catheter is placed in the remaining clot, secured in place, and the clot-busting drug alteplase (marketed as Activase®) is given through the catheter to loosen the clot and allow it to drain into a bag. This removes as much of the damage-causing blood as possible.The surgery itself takes about an hour, but the alteplase injection is repeated every eight hours. Treatment averaged 2 days after the stroke, with a range of 1-4 days. Prior to this study, it was not known how much of the blood must be removed to gain the benefit of the procedure.In 59 percent of the cases in the MISTIE III trial, the teams succeeded in reducing the clot to 15 milliliters or less. With the removal of each additional milliliter of clotted blood, the odds of a good outcome improved 10 percent.Some of these operations “were remarkable,” Awad said. Many of the surgeons were able to approach “a clot the size of a tennis ball and gently reduce it to less than 5 milliliters.”Patients could survive with less surgery and manipulation, Awad suggested. “If you get half of the clot out, you can save the person’s life,” he said. “But to get real functional benefit, you have to go all the way. You have to remove most, if not all, of the clot.” Source:https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/last_img read more

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New method to assess effectiveness of psychotherapies for social anxiety disorder

first_img Source:https://www.karger.com/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 20 2019The effectiveness of psychotherapies for social anxiety disorder (SAD) is typically evaluated using self- and clinician-reported symptom change, while biomarkers of treatment response are rarely measured.This randomized controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of single-session group interventions for SAD – imagery rescripting and verbal restructuring versus waitlist control (WC). The imagery rescripting intervention guided participants to rescript autobiographical memories through visualization whilst the verbal restructuring intervention focused on thought challenging. Outcomes included changes in psychophysiological reactivity (heart rate variability and electrodermal responding) to social stress, and symptom-based measures (social interaction anxiety, negative self-portrayal, cognitive avoidance, repetitive negative thinking, memory modification, anxious behaviors).Related StoriesNew study explores link between traffic-related air pollution and childhood anxietyDrinking Matcha tea may reduce anxious behavior, research showsStudy finds depression and anxiety symptoms among many asylum seekersPsychophysiological reactivity was selectively attenuated following imagery rescripting treatment, compared to verbal restructuring and control groups. The specific influence of the imagery-based intervention in modulating autonomic reactivity was evident across heart rate variability parameters, including the standard deviation of intervals between heartbeats, and high-frequency power – an indicator of parasympathetically mediated emotion regulation. Few group differences were observed across self-report measures.The current study highlights the specificity of brief imagery-based interventions in influencing psychophysiological reactivity in SAD and establishes the sensitivity of objective markers of treatment response in quantifying change over symptom-based measurements.​last_img read more

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Biologist uses new grant to find ways to eliminate schistosomiasis

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 22 2019A biologist at The University of Texas at Arlington is using a new grant to look for ways to finish off a disease that has stubbornly resisted all attempts to eradicate it.Todd Castoe, associate professor of biology, is co-investigator on a five-year, $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for a study titled, “Schistosomiasis at the edge of elimination: Characterizing sources of new infections in residual transmission hotspots.” Castoe’s portion of the grant is $1.159 million.The project uses cutting-edge genomic approaches–which are being conducted by Castoe and his students on equipment in his laboratory and in the state-of-the-art North Texas Genome Center housed on the UTA campus–to learn why the parasitic disease schistosomiasis persists in areas where extensive control measures against it have been implemented.Schistosomiasis is an acute and chronic disease caused by parasitic worms and is second only to malaria as the most devastating parasitic disease. It affects more than 200 million people worldwide, mostly in tropical and subtropical areas and especially in poor communities without access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation.Epidemiologists in China and other countries have been studying schistosomiasis and attempting to eliminate it for more than a decade. They have been able to achieve eradication rates of 99 percent in some areas, but the disease has resisted being wiped out entirely.”We want to find out what it is about this disease that allows it to persist even in the face of aggressive control measures,” Castoe said. “It’s important to get rid of schistosomiasis, but the scope of the project is much larger than learning how to eliminate this disease in any one area of the world.”The real importance of the study is in learning why we can’t totally eliminate this parasitic disease, and then using that knowledge to help guide eradication campaigns for this and other parasitic diseases elsewhere. There’s something about transmission patterns that perpetuate this disease that we don’t understand yet. We want to know what’s unique about the biology of this and other parasitic diseases in the end-game, when control has been fairly effective at reducing the disease but eradication cannot be achieved.”Castoe is working on the project with principal investigator Elizabeth Carlton and co-investigator David Pollock, both from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Castoe spent five years as a postdoctoral fellow in Pollock’s lab prior to coming to UTA in 2012.”Dr. Carlton contacted Dr. Pollock for help on the project, and he got in touch with me because the research I’ve been doing to generate genome data from many individual samples complemented their goals well,” Castoe said. “Using genomic sequencing, this project will provide unprecedented insight into the detailed patterns of transmission across hosts, across geographic areas and through time. This will help us to understand how to prevent infections and advance efforts to achieve permanent reductions in schistosomiasis and other human helminthiases [worm infections].”The parasites that cause schistosomiasis live a portion of their life in certain types of freshwater snails. The infectious form of the parasite, known as cercariae, emerges from the snail into the water, which then infects people during routine agricultural, occupational and recreational activities. Lack of proper hygiene and activities of school-aged children such as swimming or fishing in infested water make them especially vulnerable to infection.”One of the more exciting parts of this project is leveraging advances in sequencing technologies to improve our ability to reduce, and possibly eliminate, neglected tropical diseases,” Carlton said. “Dr. Castoe was an obvious choice due to his expertise in sequencing technologies. He is on the cutting edge of the field and one of the things that is so great about having him on the team is that he is always thinking about how we might leverage the latest advances in genomic sequencing to answer our research questions efficiently and effectively.”Carlton explained that the researchers are using new genomic sequencing technologies to map the ancestry of parasites, in an effort to identify human or animal hosts that may be acting as sources of new infection. They are following human and animal populations over time, testing them for infection and measuring risk factors.”We’re looking at new areas of infection, hotspots where we can’t eliminate it,” Castoe said. “Many of the things we learn in this project could apply globally, to various parasitic diseases in many low- and middle-income countries. That’s the goal.”College of Science Dean Morteza Khaledi praised the work that Castoe and his colleagues are doing and said it has the potential to have a far-reaching impact on health and the human condition, one of the main pillars of UTA’s Strategic Plan 2020: Bold Solutions | Global Impact.”Dr. Castoe is a leader in the field of genome sequencing and this project will benefit greatly from his expertise in this area,” Khaledi said. “It’s possible that the work he and his colleagues are doing in this study could be applied worldwide and be of tremendous benefit in the fight against parasitic diseases.”Castoe also has two other major federally funded projects underway, both involving genomic studies of snakes but seeking to answer fundamentally different questions.NSF project to understand the roles of selection and gene flow in speciation in rattlesnakesThe first of these projects, titled “Systematics, introgression and adaptation in Western Rattlesnakes: A model system for studying gene flow, selection and speciation,” is funded by a four-year, $867,402 grant from the National Science Foundation’s Division of Environmental Biology. Castoe is principal investigator; co-PIs are Matthew Fujita, UTA associate professor of biology; Stephen Mackessy, professor in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado; and Jesse Meik, assistant professor of biological sciences at Tarleton State University, who earned a Ph.D. in Quantitative Biology from UTA in 2009.The research focuses on the Western Rattlesnake and its close relatives as a model system to study the fundamental process of species formation.”Despite substantial research, the roles of natural selection in the formation of species and in preventing hybridization between species remain poorly understood,” Castoe said. “In a rapidly changing world, there is an urgent need to understand the importance of these processes in species formation and the impact of these processes on how scientists identify and name species.”The researchers will study genetic, venom protein and anatomical data to test how natural selection shapes and maintains species, then use the results to test several approaches for appropriately identifying species in nature.Related StoriesRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmias”Essentially, we’re using rattlesnakes as a model to understand how some important features of speciation work in nature,” Castoe said.Previous studies have disagreed about how many species should be recognized within this group of snakes, and different populations can produce diverse symptoms from snake bites due to differences in venom biochemistry, the researchers explained. Their goals are to resolve these issues by developing a new system for understanding and appropriately recognizing species; providing new insight into the process of species formation; developing new methods for identifying species; and refining the appropriate medical treatment of snakebites in North America.The project also includes a public outreach program, which will include educational tools and will be conducted at the Dallas and Denver Zoos, thereby reaching millions of visitors per year.NSF project on regulation of intestinal form, function, and regenerationThe second project, titled “Collaborative Research: Integrated mechanisms underlying the regulation of intestinal form and function,” is funded by a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the NSF’s Division of Integrative Organismal Systems.Castoe is principal investigator and is joined in the study by co-principal investigator Saiful Chowdhury, UTA associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and Stephen Secor, professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, who is leading concurrent research.Vertebrates exhibit a broad range of physiological capacities to alter intestinal performance that are adaptively linked to their feeding habits. This project’s goal is to understand how and why some vertebrates–including snakes that sometimes go long periods between meals–experience rapid changes in intestinal form and function when feeding, and subsequent intestinal atrophy following the completion of digestion. This is in sharp contrast with snakes that feed more often and experience only modest change in intestinal form and function.For the widely regulating Burmese python, for example, it is known that feeding triggers the differential expression of more than 1,000 intestinal genes. These snakes experience extreme regenerative intestinal growth with every major meal, and understanding how any vertebrate might accomplish such feats could be key to understanding how to direct regenerative growth in other vertebrates, like humans.”We don’t know the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the structural and functional flexibility of the intestine, and whether such mechanisms are shared across vertebrates that similarly widely or narrowly regulate intestinal performance,” Castoe said. “By leveraging the extreme range in intestinal responses exhibited by snakes and other vertebrates and recently available genomic resources, this research program will identify the underlying mechanisms of intestinal flexibility and test if these mechanisms are shared or unique across lineages and regulatory phenotypes.”Ultimately, studying other vertebrates that exhibit regenerative intestinal growth could lead to breakthroughs in learning how to control regeneration in human tissues.”The researchers are addressing these broad questions by pursuing three aims. First, they are seeking to identify the cellular and structural mechanisms that underlie the modulation of intestinal form and regeneration, and whether form strictly dictates the regulation of intestinal function. Second, they’re trying to link transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms to phenotypic changes in intestinal structure and function. Third, they want to test whether shared or unique sets of molecular mechanisms drive similar phenotypic responses among vertebrates.”Studying gene expression alone does not provide the complete picture of the function of a system. The expression and modification of proteins play significant roles in cellular functions,” Chowdhury said. “We are extracting proteins from the intestinal tissues of snakes and sequencing them using mass spectrometry. Using the same mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach, we are also identifying the phosphate modification sites in proteins. Intestinal-tissue proteomics analysis, before and after feeding, is helping us to understand the protein interaction network and signaling cascades linked to intestinal regeneration in snakes.”Chowdhury believes this project is the first to combine genomics and proteomics information to understand the molecular mechanisms which drive major shifts in intestinal function in snakes.”Ultimately, this research will identify the signaling and structural mechanisms by which vertebrates modulate intestinal form and function, and identify pathways that all vertebrates appear to possess that may direct intestinal regeneration capacity,” Castoe said. “We want to understand how vertebrates control, at the molecular level, shifts in intestinal form and function, and test if the regenerative capacities seen in some extreme vertebrate examples, like snakes, could be translated to other vertebrates such as humans.”Together, the NSF projects take advantage of the huge advances made in genome sequencing technology to tackle questions about the processes that drive diversity in form and function in nature. A number of the potential findings of these basic research studies have broad ramifications for understanding human genomic diversity and human health.”With both of these NSF projects, we’re using genomics to answer fundamental questions about biology,” Castoe said. Source:https://www.uta.edu/news/releases/2019/02/Castoe-NIH-NSF2.phplast_img read more

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New practical guide for health professionals to support emotional needs of adults

first_imgLooking after the emotional needs of people living with diabetes is as important as caring for their physical needs, but for many healthcare professionals starting those conversations isn’t easy. This resource has been created to help them feel more confident to discuss emotional needs during consultation time, provide support or refer to the right type of support when needed.It will be invaluable in supporting healthcare professionals to provide holistic care to adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes”. “Diabetes and emotional health − a practical guide for health professionals supporting adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes” was originally published by the National Diabetes Services Scheme in Australia and authored by a team of healthcare professionals specializing in psychology and diabetes. It has been adapted for a UK audience by an equivalent expert group of UK clinicians. Mar 12 2019Diabetes UK has launched a new resource to help healthcare professionals to support the emotional needs of adults with diabetes.Diabetes is more than a physical condition because the relentless need for self-management can have a profound impact on emotional health. Monitoring blood glucose, injecting insulin, taking medications, and trying to constantly follow a healthy diet can be tough on people living with the condition, leading to emotional health problems.“Diabetes and emotional health − a practical guide for health professionals supporting adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes” is an evidence based resource with dedicated chapters on common emotional issues that people living with diabetes might experience, such as eating problems, depression, anxiety disorders, fear of hypos and diabetes distress.Related StoriesDiabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have beneficial long-term clinical outcomesObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplantUranium toxicity might have caused obesity and diabetes in Kuwait, finds new studyThe guide also offers strategies and tools for how to recognize emotional problems and start conversations to address them, as well as for providing the right support, using consultation time more effectively and knowing when to refer on.The resource was designed on the premise that when healthcare professionals take someone’s emotional needs into account, diabetes management improves, because the emotional and physical aspects of diabetes management cannot be separated.Libby Dowling, Senior Clinical Advisor at Diabetes UK, said:center_img Source:https://www.diabetes.org.uk/last_img read more

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Scientist at centre of Facebook data scandal faces MPs

© 2018 AFP Professor defends role in Cambridge Analytica data scandal Explore further Citation: Scientist at centre of Facebook data scandal faces MPs (2018, April 24) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-scientist-centre-facebook-scandal-mps.html Cambridge Analytica has maintained it did not use Facebook data in the Donald Trump campaign, but its now-suspended CEO boasted in secret recordings that his company was deeply involved in the race Aleksandr Kogan, who teaches at Cambridge University, will appear before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee to explain his relationship with CA, the British-based firm accused of improperly accessing data.Kogan, a senior researcher in the university’s department of psychology, claims he is being targeted by Facebook and CA, saying he did not know his app would be used in political campaigns.Cambridge Analytica has maintained it did not use Facebook data in the Donald Trump campaign, but its now-suspended CEO boasted in secret recordings that his company was deeply involved in the race.”I’m being basically used as a scapegoat by both Facebook and Cambridge Analytica,” Kogan said last month.”We were assured by Cambridge Analytica that everything was perfectly legal and within the terms of service” of Facebook, he added.Kogan created a personality prediction app “This Is Your Digital Life” through his commercial company Global Science Research, which offered a small financial payment in return for users filling out a personality test.”We would collect things like their location, their gender, their birthday, their page ‘likes’ and similar information for their friends,” he said in a recent interview with CBS News’s 60 Minutes.Facebook says it was downloaded by 270,000 people, but it also gave Kogan access to their friends, giving him a wealth of information on 87 million users, according to the social media giant’s boss Mark Zuckerberg.Zuckerberg said the figure was calculated taking the maximum number of friends that users could have had while Kogan’s app was collecting data.’Stunned’Kogan said that CA assured him that what he was doing was “perfectly legal and within the terms of service” of the social media giant.He told the BBC he was “stunned” by the allegations.”Honestly, we thought we were acting perfectly appropriately. We thought we were doing something that was really normal.”He explained that although contacts of those doing the quiz did not opt in explicitly, the practice was permitted by Facebook, and was in fact “a core feature” of the platform for years.He claimed “tens of thousands” of apps will have taken advantage of the feature.It was, however, not part of Facebook’s terms for Kogan to transfer or sell data, although he claims that the social media giant appeared not to have a problem at the time.”I visited their campus many times,” he told 60 Minutes. “They had hired my students, I even did a consulting project with Facebook in November of 2015.” Born in Moldova and raised in Russia, before emigrating to the United States at the age of seven, Kogan studied at the University of California, Berkeley, and obtained his doctorate at the University of Hong Kong.He joined the University of Cambridge’s Department of Psychology as a lecturer in 2012.The scientist also goes by the name Aleksandr Spectre, which he took when he married his Singaporean bride, according to a post he made on Facebook, before he was banned from the service.”We changed our last name when we got married, and we chose Spectre as a derivative of Spectrum,” he wrote.”We wanted to find a last name tied to light because my wife and I are both scientists and quite religious, and light is a strong symbol in both.”We are a multi-ethnic family… and we just thought it sounded really cool!”In 2014, Kogan established his own commercial enterprise, Global Science Research (GSR), whose clients included SCL, the parent company of Cambridge Analytica.He has also worked with St Petersburg University, as well as reportedly receiving Russian government research grants. The Russian-American academic who developed an app that allowed political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica to farm the data of 87 million Facebook users faces questions Tuesday by British lawmakers. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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Fires floods and other calamities fuel this apps popularity

first_img Physicians and practices should prepare for emergencies Explore further Business has been booming. Most recently, Merjanian said, Titan HST has signed a contract with the Cal State University system, beginning with the chancellor’s office. In April, the company signed a contract valued at $300 million with New York-based Titan Global, an unrelated security firm.It wasn’t the likeliest of outcomes for a UC San Diego graduate who majored in sociology, earned his law degree from University of San Diego law school and then founded a law practice. He began to wonder how people, rather than suing after an injury, could avoid mishaps in the first place.”People date from apps, you order food from apps,” Merjanian said. “You do everything from apps, right? So why can’t you get help from an app?”Merjanian called his company Titan Health & Security Technologies Inc. but he shortened it to Titan HST for marketing and branding.”We saved our first life within 20 minutes of public deployment,” Merjanian said, recalling how a teacher returned to a science classroom and found a student trying to drink bleach.Usage has exploded. Merjanian said the system was used 62 million times in 2017, up from 16 million in 2016. The private company doesn’t reveal revenue.The app, designed for schools, businesses and government agencies, allows users to transmit emergency alerts by picking from a menu of emergency icons on a smartphone or Apple Watch. The system also is accessible through text message, email, the web and social media feeds including Facebook and Twitter. It’s available in multiple languages.”The first core function is the SOS. So you can select any kind of emergency you have,” Merjanian said.”Even though everyone is worried about active shooters, 40 percent of the use of the system is for medical emergencies. So we’re talking about everything from diabetic shock to food allergies,” he said. “A college sorority has used this to alert people at parties if they fear the drinks are being spiked.”Titan HST has created an app designed to keep people connected and well informed during natural disasters like wildfires, hurricanes and floods. It also does the same for man made incidents, such as active shooter situations. The app is being used by school districts, businesses, and medical facilities.The app can access a phone’s camera to send visual alerts.”If people are hiding from a shooter, you can see where they’re hiding and whether they’re injured or not,” Merjanian said. The app shows the location of people who are safe and those who are not, and lists those who have not checked in to report their status.The technology is still being refined, Merjanian said. The company is adding “mesh networking” to allow a phone to link to nearby phones if cellular towers are down and Wi-Fi isn’t accessible.Titan recently partnered with Newport Beach-based Exoio to make and market small sensors with a communication range of 30 feet to 1,000 feet to help pinpoint app users’ locations during emergencies. Exoio is the latest technology company started by Shawn Dougherty, co-founder and former chief operating officer of Mophie, the Tustin-based maker of phone charging accessories.The app’s cost varies by sector, volume and use type, Merjanian said. For schools, the cost starts at $2 a student per year paid by the institution, not parents. Private-sector clients usually pay between $2 and $10 per user per month.Emergency management consultant Bill Cunningham has made the Titan HST app part of preparedness plans and training he devises for businesses, government agencies and other customers.Cunningham, chief executive of Irvine-based Building Emergency Response Teams, got to try the app out sooner than expected in early September with some clients on the Caribbean island of Anguilla, including a hotel, as they braced for a direct hit from Hurricane Irma’s 185-mph winds. Cunningham had created a preparedness plan but hadn’t had time for a trial run.The Titan HST app “helped keep track of everyone to make sure they were safe,” Cunningham said. “It really worked.”The 23,000-student Newport-Mesa Unified School District has rolled out the app systemwide. It has already gotten quick medical attention for a teacher who had an emergency during a class. It’s also enabled immediate lockdowns when strangers were on campus.”It has proved to be a fantastic emergency broadcast and communications platform for our schools, our students, our families and our staff,” said Phil D’Agostino, director of student and community services for Newport-Mesa.David Marcus, campus business manager at West Hills’ De Toledo High School, said the school uses the Titan HST app but hasn’t had a real emergency yet, just lots of practice sessions for when the real thing happens.Marcus said the app has been useful in non-emergencies, alerting parents that students returning from games or field trips will be arriving late because of heavy traffic.The technology is designed to resist pranks, employing such things as geo-fencing to prevent someone from declaring a school emergency when they are actually far away from campus.”There are good control features,” Marcus said. “That’s really important because we didn’t want just anyone sending a message out to our entire school community.” The app, created by Newport Beach, Calif., start-up Titan HST, sent her a series of reassuring messages. The fire was small. It was quickly extinguished. The evacuation was precautionary. All of the students were safe.”It was great because kids don’t always have accurate information in an emergency,” Kobayashi said. “If I was just relying on my daughter to send me a text saying, ‘There’s a fire. They’re making us evacuate,’ you can imagine me thinking that the whole school’s burning down. I didn’t have to go through that.”Since its release in 2016, Titan HST’s emergency communication system has been embraced by businesses, educators and the medical profession. One reason, customers say, is the system’s reliability.Another? Americans are hungry for ways to feel safe and well informed. And little wonder, considering: -In 2016 and 2017, the FBI reported 50 active shooter incidents that left more people dead and wounded than in any previous two-year period. -U.S. natural disasters caused a record $306.2 billion in damage in 2017, shattering the inflation-adjusted mark of $214.8 billion that had stood since 2005, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. -The American Psychological Association’s most recent Stress in America Survey showed fears over personal safety and terrorism beginning to rival more typical worries about money, work and the economy. The percentage of people citing personal safety as a significant source of stress climbed to 34 percent in 2017, the highest since the question was first asked in 2008.One-third of business owners are relying on advanced technologies such as apps, drones, wearable devices and building sensors to support workplace safety, according to Nationwide Insurance’s fourth annual business owner survey, conducted in June. This use of such technology has “become a part of the business ecosystem,” Nationwide Vice President Tony Fenton said.Vic Merjanian, chief executive of Titan HST, has been riding that wave since founding the company in 2013. In 2016, his company closed seed funding and began signing up clients. On the morning a fire forced the evacuation of her daughter’s school, Ruth Kobayashi found out about it when her smartphone bleated out the distinctive tone she knows she can’t ignore: the Orange County high school’s app-based emergency communications system.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Fires, floods and other calamities fuel this app’s popularity (2018, August 24) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-calamities-fuel-app-popularity.html ©2018 Los Angeles Times Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.last_img read more

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Testing new tech in cars of the future

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Early warnings about pedestrians crossing a signalised intersection, red light violations and traffic queues are just some of the latest advanced vehicle warning systems being evaluated by QUT researchers. Provided by Queensland University of Technology Citation: Testing new tech in cars of the future (2018, August 27) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-tech-cars-future.html Professor Andry Rakotonirainy said vehicles involved in the trial would be fitted with a range of wireless and sensor technology.”We have an opportunity to consider if the system operates in the way it is intended and if it results in the desired behaviour from drivers and improves driver safety,” Professor Rakotonirainy said.CARRS-Q’s Dr Andy Bond, who is also involved in research team, said the trial was an opportunity to validate the safety benefits associated with greater awareness and instrumentation of transport systems.”By working together with greater, targeted information, drivers and ultimately vehicles can better manage challenging driving scenarios,” Dr Bond said.The study forms part of a larger program of research with TMR and iMOVE CRC including work being conducted into the public’s awareness and understanding of cooperative car technology.Participants are also being sought by CARRS-Q for a survey regarding the knowledge of transport technology and their willingness to adopt the new technology. Smart car cyberattack warning as research finds flaws in security systems Credit: Queensland University of Technology “We must ensure the C-ITS is fine-tuned to ensure the driver changes their course to avoid a crash or hazard, and thereby ensure the safety of themselves and other road users.”The driver remains in control of the vehicles at all times, and manually responds to the safety messages.”The way the vehicle responds to the safety message is in no way automated.”He said the effectiveness of the safety warnings will be dependent on certain variables when the message is sent, such as the distance between two cars, driver and vehicle related factors, road surface condition and traffic flow information. More information: For more information, see research.qut.edu.au/carrsq/pro … nsport-technologies/ The Ipswich Connected Vehicle Pilot, Australia’s largest on-road field trial to test and evaluate Cooperative Intelligent Transport System (C-ITS) vehicle safety technologies is being delivered by Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR) and iMOVE Cooperative Research Centre (iMOVE CRC).The trial is also supported by QUT’s Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety-Queensland (CARRS-Q).QUT Research Fellow Dr Mohammed Elhenawy will unveil details as to how the driver safety data will be assessed at the upcoming 6th Australian Intelligent Transport Systems Summit in Sydney on August 28-29, 2018.Five hundred vehicles, including public and fleet vehicles, will be retro-fitted with C-ITS hardware and software for the pilot study, taking place in Ipswich from late 2019.C-ITS devices will enable vehicles to communicate with other vehicles and infrastructure, such as traffic lights, as well as road operations and cloud-based sharing systems, in real-time.The Human-Machine Interface (HMI) software will display safety-related messages to the driver about potential hazards such as:-Emergency electronic brake light warningSlow/stopped vehicleTurning warning for bicycle riders and pedestriansRoad works warningTraffic queues and advanced red light notification.”We are evaluating the safety benefits of the C-ITS by examining the difference in driver behaviour when th e message system is active and inactive,” Dr Elhenawy said. Explore further Credit: Queensland University of Technologylast_img read more

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Embraer signs agreement to sell commercial division to Boeing

first_img Explore further Citation: Embraer signs agreement to sell commercial division to Boeing (2019, January 25) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-embraer-agreement-commercial-division-boeing.html Embraer shares dive after Bolsonaro voices wariness at Boeing venture © 2019 AFP The deal will see Boeing take 80 percent of the civilian business of Embraer, which is the third-biggest plane maker in the worldcenter_img Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer on Thursday signed an agreement for the sale of its commercial divison to Boeing—and set the date for a shareholders meeting to approve the tie-up on February 26. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Despite initital reservations, Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro already gave the deal—which will create a joint entity valued at $5.2 billion—his approval earlier this month.Embraer was privatized in 1994, but Brazil’s government retained a “golden share” that gave it veto power over strategic decisions.On top of getting shareholders on board, the agreement must also be approved by regulators, among other things. If all progresses without delay, the companies expect to conclude negotiations by the end of 2019.Embraer is the third-biggest plane-maker in the world, making aircraft in the civilian and military markets. The latter are exempt from the Boeing tie-up, which was first announced in July.Under the deal with Boeing, the US company will take 80 percent control of Embraer’s civilian business, putting it in a position to offer commercial planes with up to 150 seats.last_img read more

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Revolt on the horizon How young people really feel about digital technology

first_img Citation: Revolt on the horizon? How young people really feel about digital technology (2019, May 22) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-revolt-horizon-young-people-digital.html In recent weeks, both Facebook and Google have vowed to make privacy a top priority in the way they interact with users. Both companies have faced public outcry for their lack of openness and transparency when it comes to how they collect and store user data. It isn’t long ago that a hidden microphone was found in one of Google’s home alarm products. Credit: DisobeyAr/Shutterstock As digital technologies facilitate the growth of both new and incumbent organisations, we have started to see the darker sides of the digital economy unravel. In recent years, many unethical business practices have been exposed, including the capture and use of consumers’ data, anticompetitive activities and covert social experiments. The agency pendulum swings between the individual and technology. Who will take control? Credit: boykung/Shutterstock Google now plans to offer auto-deletion of users’ location history data, browsing and app activity as well as extend its “incognito mode” to Google Maps and search. This will enable users to turn off tracking. At Facebook, CEO Mark Zuckerberg, is keen to reposition the platform as a “privacy focused communications platform”, built on principles such as private interactions, encryption, safety, interoperability (communications across Facebook-owned apps and platforms) and secure data storage. This will be a tough turn around for the company that is fundamentally dependent on turning user data into opportunities for highly individualised advertising.Privacy and transparency are critically important themes for organisations today—both for those that have “grown up” online as well as the incumbents. While GenTech want organisations to be more transparent and responsible, 64% also believe that they cannot do much to keep their data private. Being tracked and monitored online by organisations is seen as part and parcel of being a digital consumer. Despite these views, there is a growing revolt simmering under the surface. GenTech want to take ownership of their own data. They see this as a valuable commodity, which they should be given the opportunity to trade with organisations. Some 50% would willingly share their data with companies if they got something in return, for example a financial incentive. Rewiring the power shiftGenTech are looking to enter into a transactional relationship with organisations. This reflects a significant change in attitudes from perceiving the free access to digital platforms as the “product” in itself (in exchange for user data), to now wishing to use that data to trade for explicit benefits.This has created an opportunity for companies that seek to empower consumers and give them back control of their data. Several companies now offer consumers the opportunity to sell the data they are comfortable sharing or take part in research which they get paid for. More and more companies are joining this space, including People.io, Killi and Ocean Protocol. Sir Tim Berners Lee, the creator of the world wide web, has also been working on a way to shift the power from organisations and institutions and back to citizens and consumers. The platform, Solid, offers users the opportunity to be in charge of where they store their data and who can access it. It is a form of re-decentralisation.The Solid POD (Personal Online Data storage) is a secure place on a hosted server or the individual’s own server. Users can grant apps access to their POD as a person’s data is stored centrally and not by an app developer or on an organisation’s server. We see this as potentially being a way to let people take back control from technology and other companies.GenTech have woken up to a reality where a life lived “plugged in” has significant consequences for their individual privacy, and are starting to push back, questioning those organisations that have shown limited concern and continue to exercise exploitative practices.It’s no wonder that we see these signs of revolt. GenTech is the generation with the most to lose. They face a life ahead intertwined with digital technology as part of their personal and private lives. With continued pressure on organisations to become more transparent, the time is now for young people to make their move. Explore furthercenter_img Data sharing by popular health apps is routine and far from transparent, warn experts Provided by The Conversation But what do young people who grew up with the internet think about this development? Our research with 400 digital natives—19- to 24-year-olds—shows that this generation, dubbed “GenTech”, may be the one to turn the digital revolution on its head. Our findings point to a frustration and disillusionment with the way organisations have accumulated real-time information about consumers without their knowledge and often without their explicit consent. Many from GenTech now understand that their online lives are of commercial value to an array of organisations that use this insight for the targeting and personalisation of products, services and experiences. This era of accumulation and commercialisation of user data through real-time monitoring has been coined “surveillance capitalism” and signifies a new economic system.Artificial intelligenceA central pillar of the modern digital economy is our interaction with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning algorithms. We found that 47% of GenTech do not want AI technology to monitor their lifestyle, purchases and financial situation in order to recommend them particular things to buy. In fact, only 29% see this as a positive intervention. Instead, they wish to maintain a sense of autonomy in their decision making and have the opportunity to freely explore new products, services and experiences.As individuals living in the digital age, we constantly negotiate with technology to let go of or retain control. This pendulum-like effect reflects the ongoing battle between the human and technology. My life, my data?Our research also reveals that 54% of GenTech are very concerned about the access organisations have to their data, while only 19% were not worried. Despite the EU General Data Protection Regulation being introduced in May 2018, this is still a major concern—grounded in a belief that too much of their data is in the possession of a small group of global companies, including Google, Amazon and Facebook. Some 70% felt this way. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Mumbai Police arrests Chota Shakeel aide Afroz Wadariya

first_imgMumbai Police arrests Chota Shakeel aide Afroz WadariyaThe official said that as soon as he reached Mumbai he was arrested at the airport and handed over to the Mumbai Police.advertisement Indo-Asian News Service MumbaiJuly 17, 2019UPDATED: July 17, 2019 14:26 IST Mumbai Police (Representational Image: PTI)HIGHLIGHTSMumbai Police arrested Afroz Wadariya aka Ahmed Raza in MumbaiWadariya was a close aide of Shakeel and used to handle the hawala transactions for themWadariya was the person who carried out the hawala transactions on the advice of underworld dons Dawood Ibrahim and Chota ShakeelIn a major boost to investigation against underworld don Chota Shakeel and Dawood Ibrahim, the Mumbai Police has arrested Afroz Wadariya aka Ahmed Raza here, officials said.Senior Mumbai Police officials told IANS that Wadariya, who was a close aide of Shakeel and used to handle the hawala transactions for them was arrested on Tuesday on the basis of a Look Out Circular notice issued against him here.The official said that as soon as he reached Mumbai he was arrested at the airport and handed over to the Mumbai Police.According to the police official, Wadariya was the person who carried out the hawala transactions on the advice of underworld dons Dawood Ibrahim and Chota Shakeel.The official said that Wadariya was directly connected to Dawood Ibrahim’s close aide Fahim Machmach.Also Read | Hafiz Saeed challenges terror financing charges against himAlso Watch | So Shayari: Imran Khan says Dawood meri ankh ka tara, Hafiz mujhe jaan se pyaraFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byManisha Pandey Tags :Follow Chota Shakeel Nextlast_img read more

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Congress MLA Roshan Baig detained at Bengaluru airport Kumaraswamy attacks BJP

first_imgKarnataka Congress MLA Roshan Baig detained at Bengaluru airport over ponzi scam case, Kumaraswamy attacks BJPCongress MLA Roshan Baig has been detained by the SIT probing the IMA ponzi scheme case. He was detained while he was trying to fly out of Bengaluru on Monday night.advertisement India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 16, 2019UPDATED: July 16, 2019 00:21 IST Congress MLA Roshan Baig was detained at the Bengaluru airport. (File photo)HIGHLIGHTSCongress MLA Roshan Baig has been detained over the IMA ponzi scheme caseBaig was caught while he was trying to flying out of BengaluruCM Kumaraswamy said Baig was with a BJP leader when detainedKarnataka Congress MLA Roshan Baig was detained for questioning by the Karnataka Police late on Monday night. He was flying out of Bangalore in a chartered flight and had already boarded the aircraft when he was apprehended.After being held, Baig gave different statements that he was going to Delhi and Pune. The flight details show he was headed to Pune.The SIT probing the IMA ponzi scheme case said, “Even though we gave a notice to Baig to appear on July 19, he was trying to flee to an undisclosed location. We can only see if we have to arrest him or not after the questioning. He was going to fly in a chartered flight from Bangalore international airport.”Today SIT probing the #IMA case detained @rroshanbaig for questioning at the BIAL airport while he was trying leave along with @BSYBJP’s PA Santosh on a chartered flight to Mumbai. I was told that on seeing the SIT, Santhosh ran away while the team apprehended Mr. Baig. 1/2 pic.twitter.com/MmyH4CyVfPH D Kumaraswamy (@hd_kumaraswamy) July 15, 2019On the other hand, Karnataka CM HD Kumaraswamy confirmed the development and slammed Opposition BJP for allegedly facilitating Baig’s escape bid.”Today SIT probing the #IMA case detained @rroshanbaig for questioning at the BIAL airport while he was trying leave along with @BSYBJP’s PA Santosh on a chartered flight to Mumbai. I was told that on seeing the SIT, Santhosh ran away while the team apprehended Mr. Baig,” wrote Kumaraswamy.He added, “BJP MLA Yogeshwar was present at the time there. It’s a shame that @BJP4Karnataka is helping a former minister escape, who is facing a probe in the #IMA case. This clearly shows #BJP’ s direct involvement in destabilizing the govt through horse trading”.Former Karnataka minister and Congress MLA R Roshan Baig did not turn up before the SIT probing the alleged IMA Jewels ponzi scheme on Monday, saying he had some urgent work.The MLA wanted to appear on July 25 but the SIT directed him to depose on July 19 instead, SIT said.A former minister in the previous Siddaramaiah government, Baig landed in the IMA controversy after the company owner Mohammed Mansoor Khan alleged that Baig took Rs 400 crore from him but did not return it.Also Read | Leaving India a big mistake, will return in 24 hours, says IMA Ponzi Scam main accused Mansoor KhanAlso Watch | Will non-stop nataka finish Congress-JDS govt in Karnataka?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanchari Chatterjee Nextlast_img read more

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Were the Vikings Smoking Pot While Exploring Newfoundland

first_imgThe discovery of cannabis pollen near a Viking settlement in Newfoundland raises the question of whether the Vikings were smoking or eating pot while exploring North America. The researchers also found evidence the Vikings occupied this outpost for more than a century, way longer than previously believed. Located in northern Newfoundland, the site of L’Anse aux Meadows was founded by Vikings around A.D. 1000. Until now, archaeologists believed that the site was occupied for only a brief period. The new research, published today (July 15) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that the Vikings lived there possibly into the 12th or even the 13th century. [In Photos: Viking Outposts Possibly Found in Canada]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65940-were-vikings-smoking-pot-in-newfoundland.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Bog finds In August 2018, an archaeological team excavated a peat bog located nearly 100 feet (30 meters) east of the Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows. They found a layer of “ecofacts” — environmental remains that may have been brought to the site by humans — that were radiocarbon dated to the 12th or 13th century. These ecofacts include remains of two beetles not native to Newfoundland — Simplocaria metallica, from Greenland, and Acidota quadrata, from the Arctic. The layer also held pollen from Juglans (walnuts) and from Humulus (cannabis), two species that don’t naturally grow at L’Anse aux Meadows; rather, the Vikings could have picked up all of these plant and animal species when they sailed south. [Photos: 10th-Century Viking Tomb Unearthed in Denmark] They also found the remains of dung from grazing caribou, as well as remains of wood and charcoal. The layer from the peat bog is similar to other “cultural layers from across the Norse North Atlantic,” the archaeological team wrote in the journal article. More evidence Additionally, the archaeologists performed Bayesian analysis — a type of statistical analysis — on radiocarbon dates from artifacts previously excavated at L’Anse aux Meadows. That analysis also suggested Viking occupation for up to 200 years. “This does not imply a continuous occupation,” the researchers wrote, noting that the Vikings could have abandoned and reoccupied L’Anse aux Meadows when it suited them. Did the Vikings use pot in Newfoundland? The finding of cannabis pollen raises the question of whether the Vikings used cannabis for making clothes or for medicinal-recreational purposes while they explored North America. Paul Ledger, the lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at Memorial University of Newfoundland urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. Ledger urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. It’s also possible that some of the other “ecofacts” were brought to the peat bog by indigenous peoples who lived in Newfoundland, and not by the Vikings. [Fierce Fighters: 7 Secrets of Viking Seamen] Ultimately, “the results presented here [in the journal article] pose more questions than answers,” the archaeological team wrote. Reaction from other Viking researchers Viking researchers not affiliated with the research team urged caution about the results. “I think it is too early to draw any conclusions,” said Birgitta Wallace, a senior archaeologist emerita with Parks Canada who has done extensive research on the Vikings in North America. Wallace told Live Science that she isn’t convinced that the Vikings left behind these ecofacts. “I think it is highly unlikely that the Norse [another word for Vikings] would have returned in the 12th and 13th centuries, as there are no structures on the site from that period that could be Norse,” Wallace said. “We do know that there were indigenous people, ancestors of the Beothuk, on the site at that time.” Patricia Sutherland, a visiting scientist at the Canadian Museum of Nature who has also done extensive research on the Vikings in North America, said that while the Vikings could have been in Newfoundland during the 12th or 13th centuries, it is too early to say for sure. “It seems premature to suggest such a scenario on the basis of the ‘ecofacts’ listed in the paper,” Sutherland said. It’s possible that some of the beetles and plant pollen found in the layer were brought to L’Anse aux Meadows by the Vikings around A.D. 1000, and they continued to flourish after the Vikings left, Sutherland said. The research team plans to continue their work at L’Anse aux Meadows in August, Ledger said. The 25 Most Mysterious Archaeological Finds on Earth Photos: Viking Warrior Is Actually a Woman 30 of the World’s Most Valuable Treasures That Are Still Missing Editor’s note: This article was updated to fix a statement about the interpretation of the cannabis pollen. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndo23andMeCould a DNA kit from 23andMe help you learn more about your health?23andMeUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndolast_img read more